Home > Burglary in UK > UK's Burglary Hot Spots

UK's Burglary Hot Spots

By: Thomas Muller - Updated: 9 Jan 2013 | comments*Discuss
 
Insurance Nottingham Uk Burglary Hot

Although burglary in the UK has been on the decline for a decade now, there are nevertheless parts of the country that are cause for greater security concern than others. Which are these places and where is it we should we sleep easier at night?

The Burglary Hot Spots

In a 2008 survey by a national insurance firm, Nottingham was awarded the dubious prize of being the UK’s number one burglary hot spot, with home theft levels 63% above the national average. Fighting for second and third place were London and Bristol, with rates 50.8% and 50.7% over the national average respectively.

Other names in the top ten included the regular favourites – Leeds, Hull, Manchester – and a couple of perhaps more surprising names – Cambridge and Reading.

Crime Capital Nottingham

Nottingham has developed a disturbing reputation for burglary and crime in general. This is the third time in a row that the north midland city, spiritual home to both lace and Robin Hood, has picked up the title of ‘burglary capital’, and it has been a regular feature of hotspot lists for many years prior. In the Home Office crime data for 2001, Nottingham topped the burglary table with 53 incidents per 1,000 residents, and was followed then by Manchester, Middlesbrough and Hull.

This news will not help the image of a city already struggling with a reputation for violent crime, following a series of high profile shootings, and an unflattering label as Britain’s ‘gun city’. Only two years ago a survey by the Reform think-tank concluded that Nottingham was the most dangerous city in England. The study revealed that residents of the city were ten times more likely to be the victim of crime than those in South end, Essex.

Nottingham City Council and Nottinghamshire Police condemned the Reform survey as being inaccurate largely because it used out of date population figures and only compiled statistics from the central urban district rather than the entire metropolis.

Burglary in the Capital

London might be a regular feature of the burglary risk lists but it is unfair to brand the city as a whole; it is a vast and sprawling metropolis with, like all cities, both its vulnerable and safe areas.

Met figures show that the residential district of Kentish Town was the capital’s worst target for burglary, with the Cantelowes area suffering 24 burglaries per 1,000 residents during 2007. The Camden district headed a list that entertained competition from a number of areas of Haringey, as well parts of Hillingdon, Islington, Hammersmith and Fulham.

For residents in those areas now beset by worry and looking to flee to London’s most hospitable environs, the figures also revealed that the Eastbrook area of Barking and Dagenham was the safest, with 1.68 burglaries per 1,000 residents. Areas of Kingston-upon-Thames and the southern boroughs of Sutton and Bromley also featured highly in the safe list.

The UK’s Safe Spots

In the UK burglary survey, the towns and cities least troubled by burglars were Dundee, Norwich, Swindon and Guildford, with the latter taking the title of Britain least burgled town or city. The Surrey town’s recorded number of property break-ins was 82% below the national average.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Why not be the first to leave a comment for discussion, ask for advice or share your story...

If you'd like to ask a question one of our experts (workload permitting) or a helpful reader hopefully can help you... We also love comments and interesting stories

Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the SecuredHome website. Please read our Disclaimer.